Monday, August 11, 2008

To Villainize, or not

One day after I hoped that China not be villainized more than John Edwards, I found out a friend was taken away to make the Olympics more peaceful and harmonious.

It's a tricky business to love this place. For there are always many reasons not to.

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

whenever i hear western media "helping" activists, i think of those naive kids of 6/4. that wench chai ling and her idiot cohorts caused so many people to die for nothing -- the bi*ch even had the audacity to think of going back to china for business! i've gone back to look at the moments of that time and it's just so apparent that those kids were egged on by the western media.

it's now as it was then: the state wants evolution, not revolution. it's just that the pace of change has to be balanced with the stability of society. eventually, the middle class, perhaps representing the equilibrium of tangible/intangible needs of society, will be large and vocal enough to demand and BE READY to receive those changes.

hang in there, i think China may be a generation away... maybe even less. japan, korea, and taiwan all went through the same evolution.

Anonymous said...

whenever i hear western media "helping" activists, i think of those naive kids of 6/4. that wench chai ling and her idiot cohorts caused so many people to die for nothing -- the bi*ch even had the audacity to think of going back to china for business! i've gone back to look at the moments of that time and it's just so apparent that those kids were egged on by the western media.

it's now as it was then: the state wants evolution, not revolution. it's just that the pace of change has to be balanced with the stability of society. eventually, the middle class, perhaps representing the equilibrium of tangible/intangible needs of society, will be large and vocal enough to demand and BE READY to receive those changes.

hang in there, i think China may be a generation away... maybe even less. japan, korea, and taiwan all went through the same evolution.

Beijing Loafer said...

I agree with you that irrational activism would get us nowhere. But where's the rational activism that pushed for changes in Korea and Taiwan?

The State surely wants an evolution, but I'm not sure it has any plan in terms of timing. The vested interests simply enjoy too much in the current system.

Whenever I feel uneasy about the pace of change and human tragedies before the change, I remind myself of how democracy came about in the UK. It could take centuries, but it certainly will come.

Lu said...

I think the trick is to love the place while criticizing the party. They're not one and the same. The Chinese are a great people, who deserve a better government.

Beijing Loafer said...

Hmm... I don't think the government is completely opposed to the people. The government comes from the people and people's culture and attitude influence the bahevior of the government.

I only hope that the old will die out soon...except my parents and my relatives, of course.

Amanda said...

Lack of transparency leads to corruption...corruption leads to inefficiency...inefficiency stymies growth.

Lu said...

I also don't think the government is opposed to the people (without the people, they wouldn't have anything to be government over), but I think that the national government wants to do things in the interest of the people, but not if that would go against its own interest (power); and many local governments seem to feel that the people are there for their convenience, instead of the other way around.
Either way, even governments with the best of intentions can get things wrong (as governments consist of people), and therefore criticism should be welcomed, not banned.